How Sitting Can Affect Health

Updated: Aug 22, 2018

If you work a 9-to-5 job, chances are much of your day is spent sitting – whether during your commute, at your desk, or in meetings. But recent research has highlighted that long periods of sitting can be bad for your health.

Sitting for much of the day means you’re less physically active and not expending a significant amount of energy or utilizing your muscles, which can lead to a decrease in metabolism. As obesity and obesity-related diseases continue to rise, simply standing more throughout the day may lead to significant changes in overall health.

Health-related problems that may be associated with prolonged sitting include:

Not only does prolonged sitting increase the risk for a host of health problems, it may even take years off your life. In fact, it may be so detrimental that many have said that sitting is the new smoking.

One of the ways people are trying to reduce their sitting time during the day is by opting for a standing desk. Research shows that people may actually be more productive when they’re standing – not only will you likely burn a few additional calories, but you might also get more done. If you really want to get moving during your day, you might take it a step further (pun intended!) with a treadmill desk.

Of course, standing all day may not be the best option for everyone. Adding movement may be better to support long-term health. Getting up once an hour can be a great way to get your energy flowing and decrease the negative effects of sitting. In fact, walking for just two minutes every hour may decrease the risk of premature death by up to one-third!

How do you like to add movement into you day? Share your tips with us!

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